Fideltube.com
Welcome
Login / Register

Ethiopian News


  • Ethiopia’s Internet crackdown hurts everyone

    Ethiopia has never been an easy place to operate. But a six-month state of emergency, combined with internet and travel restrictions imposed in response to a wave of anti-government protests, means it just got a whole lot harder.

    The government has targeted the mobile data connections that the majority of Ethiopians use to get online. Internet users have also been unable to access Facebook Messenger and Twitter, with a host of other services also rendered unreliable. 

    This has impacted everyone: from local businesses, to foreign embassies, to families, as well as the extensive and vital international aid community.

    “Non-governmental organisations play crucial roles in developing countries, often with country offices in the capitals, satellite offices across remote regions, and parent organisations in foreign countries,” said Moses Karanja, an internet policy researcher at Strathmore University in Nairobi.  “They need access to the internet if their operations are to be efficiently coordinated.”

    The Ethiopian government has been candid about the restrictions being in response to year-long anti-government protests in which hundreds of people have died.

    It has singled out social media as a key factor in driving unrest. Since the beginning of October, there has been a spike in violence resulting in millions of dollars’ worth of damage to foreign-owned factories, government buildings and tourist lodges across Oromia Region, initially ground zero for the dissent.

    “Mobile data will be permitted once the government assesses that it won’t threaten the implementation of the state of emergency,” government spokesman Getachew Reda – who has since been replaced – told a 26 October press conference in Addis Ababa.

     

     Read more here

     

    Read more »
  • Ethiopia’s Internet crackdown hurts everyone

    Ethiopia has never been an easy place to operate. But a six-month state of emergency, combined with internet and travel restrictions imposed in response to a wave of anti-government protests, means it just got a whole lot harder.

    The government has targeted the mobile data connections that the majority of Ethiopians use to get online. Internet users have also been unable to access Facebook Messenger and Twitter, with a host of other services also rendered unreliable. 

    This has impacted everyone: from local businesses, to foreign embassies, to families, as well as the extensive and vital international aid community.

    “Non-governmental organisations play crucial roles in developing countries, often with country offices in the capitals, satellite offices across remote regions, and parent organisations in foreign countries,” said Moses Karanja, an internet policy researcher at Strathmore University in Nairobi.  “They need access to the internet if their operations are to be efficiently coordinated.”

    The Ethiopian government has been candid about the restrictions being in response to year-long anti-government protests in which hundreds of people have died.

    It has singled out social media as a key factor in driving unrest. Since the beginning of October, there has been a spike in violence resulting in millions of dollars’ worth of damage to foreign-owned factories, government buildings and tourist lodges across Oromia Region, initially ground zero for the dissent.

    “Mobile data will be permitted once the government assesses that it won’t threaten the implementation of the state of emergency,” government spokesman Getachew Reda – who has since been replaced – told a 26 October press conference in Addis Ababa.

     

     Read more here

     

    Read more »
  • Abe Gashahun And Fotyen Tesfay , Surprise Winners At The 16th Great Run

    Making their bids to rise from the crowded ranks of their nation’s deep well of distance talent, junior runners Abe Gashahun and Fotyen Tesfay were the surprise winners at the 16th Great Ethiopian Run 10km road race in Addis Ababa on Sunday (20).

    Gashahun, 18, won one of the closest finishes in the race’s 16-year history, just edging Kenyan Jerome Lumbasi by one second in 28:53.

    Four athletes entered the final home straight locked together before Gashahun clinched victory just a few metres from the finish.

    Gashahun, who is coached by Haji Ajilo comes from Debre Birhan, 120 kilometres northeast of Addis Ababa, and had travelled to the capital yesterday for this race.

    “I hope that my win today will give me more opportunities to compete in international races abroad,” said Gashahun, who finished eighth at the 2015 IAAF World Cross Country Championships in Guiyang, China, and fifth over 5000m at the African Junior Championships that same year, also in Addis Ababa.

    Read more »
  • Ethiopia’s gov’t spokesman decried the election of Trump to lead the U.S

    Ethiopia’s newly sworn in government spokesman, Negeri Lencho, said the election of Donald Trump is not good both for his country and for the African continent as a whole and has described him as ‘an extremely neo- liberalist.’ According to him, Trump is ‘always inward looking’ with less care for the rest of the world.

    “I don’t think the election of Trump will benefit Africa,” Negeri said adding that he was wishing Secretary Hillary Clinton could win the 2016 US election. “First, he is only interested in trade deals that only benefit the United States. Second, his immigration policy could affect thousands of Ethiopians who live in the United States. And finally, his political tactics are dangerous.”

    According to Negeri, Tump may change some of his hard- line policies once he occupies the White House in January. He has described the current U.S- Ethiopian relations as ‘very good’ and ‘longstanding.’

    Read more »
RSS